Monthly Archives: February 2019

Preparing for NDIS Planning with Regional Communication Service Support

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) has been described as the biggest change in social services in 30 years and offers people who have received very little services in the past the opportunity to access life changing funding. But big changes can be disruptive and a bit scary, and the question on everyone’s mind is how to navigate the planning process to ensure that loved ones get the funding they need.

Planning for an NDIS planning meeting is one of the most important things people can do to ensure they get funding for communication supports that will make a difference in their lives. So, the North West Regional Communication Service has been offering  information sessions to support people to do this. Two information sessions have been run, and included information and discussion about setting goals, the range of communication aids available and where to go for support. These sessions were attended by adults with disabilities, their families and support workers. Many of the people who attended had not accessed speech pathology services in a long time and were excited about the possibilities that are now available.

Exploring communication aids and strategies

The information sessions generated a lot of discussion about how to navigate a new system that can seem quite alien and daunting. People who attended said that it was extremely beneficial to have the opportunity to exchange ideas with others going through the same process.

The groups recognised how very important it is to be prepared and organised well before your NDIS planning meeting to make sure you get the most out of your NDIS plan.

Here some of the tips suggested:

Be prepared and organised well before your planning meeting

It is recommended to start planning 3 months before your next review. There are lots of different ways to get prepared including planning workbooks and group sessions.

Collect any recent assessment reports and recommendations from existing service providers to bring to your planning meeting.

Think about your goals

Any services requested must directly link to your goals. Think about what your long and short term goals are and what supports you need to achieve these. You can talk to your current service providers for support in writing goals.

Use the language of the NDIS

It is a good idea to link your goals to the buzzwords of the NDIS. This will help your planner to understand that your goals are in line with the goals of the NDIS. Think about how your goals fit in with the following areas: Daily Living, Home, Health and Well-being, Lifelong Learning, Work, Social and Community Participation, Relationships and Choice and Control. The NDIS price guide can be a good tool to learn the lingo. 

Write a written justification if you didn’t use all the funding in your plan

There are many reasons why a person might not use all the allocated funding in their plan. There might be long wait lists for services, limited services available in rural and regional areas or an illness in the family. It is a good idea to write down why specific funding hasn’t been used and specify that it is still needed for the next plan.

Know that Support Coordination is available 

Support Coordinators are people who can help you make the most out of your funds by linking you in with service providers and helping you understand your plan. You can  ask for this to be included in your NDIS plan.

Seek support from others

It can be overwhelming to have to find services, manage funding and navigate a whole new system. Talk to family and friends about your experience and ask them to share theirs with you. Do they have a great speech pathologist that they can pass on to you? Can they pass on pearls of wisdom for preparing for planning meetings? It can make us feel supported to connect with others who are going through similar experiences.

Other tips

  • You can have more than one communication aid funded
  • Provide a quote where possible
  • Ask to see the plan before it is finalised
  • Bring someone with you to the planning meeting
  • Ask for a review if you are not happy with the plan
  • Swallowing assessments and reviews are currently being funded by the NDIS

Organisations or groups in the North West Metropolitan Region can contact the North West Regional Communication Service if interested in hosting an information session facilitated by the North West Regional Communication Service.

A special recipe for Bourkie’s Bakery

The Woodend Communication Access Group has recognised Bourkie’s Bakery as a great place to be.

Bourkies Manager receiving the award from two of the Woodend Communication Access Group members

What was the recipe for this award to happen?

Ingredients:

The Group, comprising five people with communication disabilities living in Woodend.

The Woodend Communication Coordinator, who was trained and participates in the network supported by the Regional Communication Service.

The Regional Communication Service speech pathologist

The staff and management of Bourkies

Method:

Take the partnership between the Regional Communication Service and the Communication Coordinator. Mix with the Woodend Communication Access Group.

Add the Communication Access Network’s communication friendly certificate and the Regional Communication Services’s picture based communication board.

Leave to rise.

Take the risen mixture and bake… into a certificate that lists the great things Bourkies does

Serve:

VIsit Bourkies and present the certificate to the Manager and Staff with each Group member pointing out one reason for the award.

The icing on the cake

Next, the Communication Coordinator and the Communication Access Group will work with Bourkies to develop some picture based communication aids, so there can be even better communication.

Meg Irwin (Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service) with apologies for stretching a metaphor

The Year in Review: The North West Communication Coordinator Network

The Northwest Communication Coordinator Network has been running for nearly 10 years! Two Speech Pathologists facilitate monthly meetings and site visits focusing on training, peer support and mentoring. Communication Coordinators from 8 different disability services are involved in the network. Communication Coordinators are Disability Support Workers who receive extra training and support to implement communication strategies in their service.  Communication Coordinators reflected on the barriers, enablers and successes of 2018.

A visual aid to support understanding and participation

Enablers to creating a culture of communication

Communication Coordinators listed many factors that promote a culture of communication at their services. A key factor identified was interest and support from staff. Communication Coordinators noted that having a collaborative and supportive team was essential in implementing strategies across the service. Support from managers was another factor that was identified as important. 

One Communication Coordinator stated that they have a supportive manager who is pro-active in promoting communication and that it filters down to the rest of the staff.

The monthly Communication Coordinator Network meetings were identified as highly valuable, as they provide the opportunity to share ideas and resources, receive specialised training and peer-support. Training on the topics of communication levels and appropriate strategies, sensory focused approaches, positive behaviour support and supported decision making were identified as appropriate and valuable. 

Communication Coordinators commented that the specialised support provided by the speech pathologists who facilitate the Network is highly valuable. One Communication coordinator said that receiving professional support in their own working environment provides an opportunity for practical suggestions that are relevant to their service.

Barriers to creating a culture of communication

Communication Coordinators identified the biggest barrier to creating a culture of communication at their services as insufficient time. Most Communication Coordinators are given one day per week away from clients to fulfil their Communication Coordinator role. It was reported that planning, creating and implementing communication strategies across the service needs more time than this.

Many Communication Coordinators noted that there is no time allocated for staff training. Training time would be invaluable in supporting staff to increase their knowledge and skills around communication. Another identified barrier was changes in service delivery attributed to the roll out of the NDIS. Some Communication Coordinators noted an increase in casual staff and decrease in permanent staff at their service. Many reported that this makes it difficult to implement consistent and sustainable communication strategies.

Achievements in 2018

There have been so many positive outcomes from the Communication Coordinator Network in 2018!

A strong theme has been increased opportunities for participants to make choices in daily activities. Two Communication Coordinators reported that participants are now choosing and purchasing their own drinks out in the community, where they were not previously. They reflected that participants are becoming more confident and independent.

Each monthly meeting includes Key Word Sign practice on different vocabulary, such as birthdays, holidays and football. Some Communication Coordinators have seen increased use of Key Word Sign by staff and participants at their service. One Communication Coordinator is a Key Word Sign presenter and another one is attending presenter training in January.

One Communication Coordinator has been heavily involved in NDIS pre-planning at their service. She has completed communication audits for each participant. These audits are used throughout the pre-planning process to identify goals, resources and services that would benefit the individual. A pre-planning Talking Mats set has been developed and a plan has been made for each participant to have a Talking Mats conversation prior to their next NDIS planning meeting.

Some cards for Talking Mats

Visual aids are common strategies used across services. One service has created communication boards to be used in every program. Another service has created a birthday calendar which is generating a lot of excitement; some participants are even making each other birthday cards. One Communication Coordinator has focused on supporting staff to use communication apps such as Tools2Talk+ and Key Word Sign Australia. They commented that staff are beginning to create their own visual aids for programs.

A big focus of the Communication Coordinator Network this year has been on how to successfully implement strategies. It can sometimes feel like a lot of pressure to produce lots of strategies and content but it is important to give each new strategy enough implementation time in order for them to be effective and sustainable. There have been ongoing discussions about the importance of working with staff in programs to modelling new strategies and seek staff input. Staff may require ongoing support to understand what a strategy is, how it is useful and how to use it with a participant. Giving enough time and support is essential for our work as capacity builders.

It is amazing to see such dedicated Communication Coordinators and we look forward to an exciting year ahead!