Monthly Archives: July 2019

Hospital Passports for people with disabilities

Hospitals are big and busy places. When people with specific needs or communication disabilities have to come to hospital, problems can arise. Research has repeatedly demonstrated poorer health outcomes for people with intellectual disabilities than for the general community.

Bendigo Health wanted to improve the way it provided services to this group and to others who faced barriers because of cognitive and/or communication barriers. The Victorian Department of Health and Human Services provided a grant to employ a project worker.

The Regional Communication Service was consulted as the project was getting off the ground. We provided information about the range of strategies and solutions in Augmentative and Alternative Communication, support, information access and way finding which have been used in other hospitals around the world.

The first and second pages of the Bendigo Health Hospital Passport

It was decided that the first strategy to try was the Hospital Communication Passport. This is a template developed in the UK for use in the Hospital setting. It provides information about how the person being admitted communicates, how to best support them, and who this person is as a person. It means that staff who read it, especially if they do so before the person arrives, can make the admission much more successful.

Over a couple of years the project worker (who was a speech pathologist) adapted the template for local use, spoke to many forums, formed partnerships, visited workplaces where people with disabilities were supported, spoke to people with disabilities, trained hospital staff, and did all the work that was needed to get the template to be used effectively.

The Regional Communication Service was involved along the way, in particular, with feedback from disability service staff and people with disabilities in the community about how the implementation of the Hospital Passport was going.

Last month, the project worker finished her work. Use of the Hospital Passport is now embedded in the Hospital’s procedures.

Read more about the Hospital Passport used by Bendigo Health at https://www.bendigohealth.org.au/disability_or_special_needs/

Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service

Workers learn to support people with disabilities to communicate effectively

East Hume Regional Communication Service

Nineteen participants attended a morning of information and activities designed to raise awareness about communication difficulty.  Kelsey and Meredith provided strategies that support people to communicate more successfully, including an introduction to Key Word Sign.

Signing together

Participants included disability support workers, parents and family members of people with communication difficulty, and NDIS support coordinators.

Communication with Key Word Sign

Here’s what some participants said about the training:

“it is very important for all disability support workers/community services to attend this type of training; especially support workers”

“Good short course, great to have 2 presenters!”

“Very descriptive and covered areas interesting regarding my employment”

“ Very entertaining and informative…”

More workshops are planned in other LGA’s including Wodonga and Alpine

Better communication

Hi, I’m Hannah Chalker, a Communication Coordinator supported by North West Regional Communication Service at Distinctive Options. I have interviewed several of our participants and they have given permission to share what they said.

They talk about their perspectives about challenges they face, what works well and ideas on how we can communicate better together. Let’s hear what one person (also called Hannah!) said.

Hi, my name is Hannah. I  am 20. I live with PKAN, which affects my ability to move my tongue and means I can’t form words clearly.

Hannah

Q: Do you struggle to communicate to others? Do people struggle to communicate with you?

Yes, people don’t always understand me, even if they know me well. I often don’t have my tablet (which has a speech app) accessible, as I don’t have anywhere handy to put it. 

People who don’t know me don’t speak to me. They will speak to whoever I’m with, because they don’t understand what I’m saying.

Q What is your biggest barrier to getting your message across?

Not always having my tablet handy to use my speech app.

Q What have you found to be the best way for you to communicate to people who don’t know you well?

My Verbally app, talking really slowly and gesturing.

Q What are some annoying things that people do when communicating with you?

  • Speak to me like I’m a baby; e.g. “Hello sweetie”
  • Speak to the person with me, instead of to me
  • Not giving me the opportunity to talk back because my phone is in my bag.

Q Do you have any advice for people who feel nervous to speak to you?

Just speak to me like you would any other 20yr old.

Q What can people do so you feel included in conversations and activities?

Look at me if you’re talking to me or ask me something and give me time to answer. Get my tablet out so I can talk back.

Thank you Hannah!

(Since this interview, Hannah has new tags on her wheelchairs which say ‘Please get my tablet out of my bag for me’ . She gesture to them any time she needs to.)