Tag Archives: capacity building

Happy Ninth Birthday, Stroke a Chord Choir!

Stroke a Chord Choir is celebrating nine years of educating communities about stroke and aphasia – and of bringing joy to members and audiences.

This unique choir of stroke survivors with aphasia (loss of speech after stroke) began in 2010. The choir is supported by Maroondah’s Metroaccess worker and the Eastern Regional Communication Access Network speech pathologist. The choir began after Wendy Lyons, a stroke survivor herself, noticed that some people in her stroke group couldn’t speak, but could sing. The choir is conducted by a qualified music therapist and has had ongoing commitment from talented and passionate volunteer musicians.

Though remaining unfunded, the choir has hit many high notes, including a documentary film, several pieces of research, a book of members’ stories, as well as numerous performances including 8 large annual concerts. The latest achievement was a combined choir performance at Hamer Hall for an audience of 2000 people.

The choir has inspired several similar “aphasia” or “neurological” choirs to form in Victoria, Australia and even worldwide, with a Facebook page “Aphasia Choirs go global”, which is co – hosted with international specialists in music, speech and the brain.

Listen out as this small choir makes a big noise – singing its way towards a decade of inspiration!

Mentoring speech pathologists in AAC

CAN’s work is all about inclusion and participation of people with communication disabilities in their communities.

People with communication disabilities benefit if their speech pathologist is competent in AAC and related areas. If a person has effective AAC, opportunities for social relationships, choice, and community participation open up.

Regional Communication Services provide specialised peer support to local speech pathologists to develop their skills.

With the roll out of NDIS in Loddon, new speech pathologists have arrived.

Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service has been mentoring them on request.

This time, when another speech pathologist asked for particular support, we decided to make it a two hour session and invite anyone from local speech pathology services who wanted to come.

There was an immediate response from five different service managers. Ultimately new speech pathologists from three services attended our session on positive behaviour support and strategies for communication.

The session included:

-orientation and reminders about elements of positive behaviour support

-real life stories about working with staff and services delivering positive behaviour support

-exploring options and resources for communication support

In evaluation feedback all these were identified as key learning areas.

The speech pathologists also enjoyed meeting each other and learning together.

We all agreed this was a two hours well spent.