Tag Archives: communication access assessor

Communication Access at the City of Greater Bendigo

The City of Greater Bendigo Service Desks Communication Access Symbol assessment is probably happening right now! Good luck everybody!

The City of Greater Bendigo has a population of more than 110,000 people. A few years ago, it identified communication access as an important part of its Community Access and Inclusion Plan. It requested support from the Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service.

Initial planning and training took place with the Manager of Customer Support and some selected “champions” working on the City of Greater Bendigo Service Desks.

Other Managers were informed and consulted about City of Greater Bendigo’s actions to achieve communication access.

One of the CoGB Service Desk Communication Book produced in collaboration with Service Desk staff and clients by the Regional Communication Service

The Mayor and Councillors and the Disability Inclusion Reference Committee were informed and reviewed the communication aids. The website was reviewed and changed.

By the start of 2019 City of Greater Bendigo service desks in three locations felt nearly ready for assessment.

City of Greater Bendigo promoting its communication access initiatives

In the first half of the year, the Regional Communication Service and City of Greater Bendigo staff worked hard to realise their goal to be awarded the Communication Access Symbol at the three main Service hubs in Bendigo and Heathcote.

Early in the year the Regional Communication Service observed and reported to City of Greater Bendigo managers on communication accessibility at the Service Desks. This led to some meetings with managers, to review results and plan responses.

The Regional Communication Service worked closely with the Customers Support Manager to make sure commercial picture communication symbols were properly acknowledged, to create explanatory material for the public and staff, and to organise staff training, including pre training questionnaires and tasks, pre and post training evaluations, scenarios for inclusion in training, and payment for the co trainer, who was a Communication Access Assessor and an Augmentative and Alternative Communication user.

The Regional Communication Service planned the training with the Communication Access Assessor. Four two hour trainings were delivered so that all staff at Bendigo and Heathcote Service Desks could attend.

Evaluations indicated that the training was highly valued overall. Participating in scenarios and roles plays, learning to use communication aids, learning how to interact with people with communication disabilities, and being able to ask a person with communication disability questions were all repeatedly commended. Everyone reported that they would recommend the training to others. 

The Communication Access Symbol

After City of Greater Bendigo receives its award, the Regional Communication Service will continue to support the sustainability of communication access. For example:

  • There is an identified champion who will review important elements of communication access provided by the Regional Communication Service regularly.
  • Links to CAN videos have been provided to enable new staff to understand communication access and old staff to refresh their knowledge.
  • There will be further liaison with City of Greater Bendigo Education staff who attended the training to ensure continued staff support.
  • The Regional Communication Service is involving other local organisations who can help resource the City of Greater Bendigo in communication access.

We hope more City of Greater Bendigo services will be developing their communication access.

Now another local government area has approached the Regional Communication Service for communication support, after seeing what the City of Greater Bendigo has done.

Meg Irwin, Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service

Ordering Lunch – From “potluck” to “easy” with Visual Menus

Gippsland Regional Communication Service is working with Cells Café in Bairnsdale to increase communication access.

Cells Café is a social enterprise creating employment opportunities for people with disabilities in East Gippsland.

The café has a strong commitment to everyone being able to participate. It is working towards being awarded the Communication Access Symbol.

As part of the process, communication access at the Café was informally assessed by Frank Powell, a local man with a disability. Frank has completed training in communication access.

During Cells Café’s communication access journey, there have been many positive changes. Mel Newcomen (Gippsland Regional Communication Service) and Frank reflected on what has happened so far.

Mel Newcomen (Gippsland Regional Communication Service, Scope) and Frank Powell with the visual menu

Frank thinks the visual menu has made the most difference. Frank said that he could only make “potluck” orders the first time he visited, because the menu was only in written format.

 

The original menu

He suggested the menu could include photos of the food, so more people could order independently.

The Café added photos of the food with the prices. They also changed the format from trifold to A4 pages, which is more accessible for people with low literacy and for people who use one hand to open the menu.

The improved accessible menu

When Frank returned to the Café after the changes had been made, he found “they have done a good job.” Mel asked if Frank could order what he wanted this time. “Of course I could, easy”, Frank said, smiling.

Visual menus are a small change that have a large impact on communication access. More people can order the food they want and participate in our community.

Visual menus can make the  difference between getting a “potluck” lunch to choice being “easy”.

 

Mel Newcomen, Speech Pathologist, Gippsland Regional Communication Service, Scope