Tag Archives: communication access

Fun at the Pool for everyone

Swimming is stressful for some people. How can we make it more enjoyable?

Jocelyn, a Gippsland Regional Communication Service speech pathologist, happened to be at the local pool. She watched as staff struggled with a patron who did not want to swim. Jocelyn had made social stories about swimming lessons for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, and parents had reported they were very helpful. Jocelyn figured an adult version could also help adults with cognitive and communication impairments prepare for their pool visit. They could know in advance what the pool looks like, who will be there, and what will happen. 

Draft: Preparing for what might happen at the swimming pool

The facility management were quick to jump on board and support the project. Resources are being prepared right now! There will be a standard book that can be given to anyone, as well as a template that can be personalised with an individual’s own photos.

When the resources are designed, Jocelyn will seek feedback from community members and facility staff before finalising the books.

Expect more happy splashing in the local pool!

Communication Access Symbol awarded to City of Greater Bendigo: What Next?

Maintaining Communication Access at CoGB

City of Greater Bendigo has met the Standards to be awarded the Communication Access Symbol at their three main Service Centres in Bendigo and Heathcote. Their front doors now sport the Symbol.

So what next?

To continue to meet the Standards, City of Greater Bendigo will complete self assessments prior to another external assessment by Scope in 3 years.

In order to keep up the good work, City of Greater Bendigo has an identified Communication Access Champion (as part of her current work). She makes sure:

  • new staff complete CAN’s Communication Access E-learning package as part of their induction process
  • staff and customers regularly review communication aids and the aids are updated
  • documents for customers are in accessible formats
  • signage is clear
  • customers are asked for feedback on how communication accessible they find City of Greater Bendigo’s service desks
  • the Regional Communication Service provides more training for staff as needed

Well done, City of Greater Bendigo!

PS Did you know that the Inclusive Towns project, funded through an NDIS Information, Linkages and Capacity Building National Readiness Grant, has been extended? On 1 August we heard that half a million dollars had been allocated to the new “Champions for Change” program across Mount Alexander, City of Greater Bendigo, and Loddon shires to promote employment of people with disabilities to local businesses.

Communication Access at the Royal Melbourne Hospital – Royal Park Campus: A Communication Access Consultant

As a new member of the North West Regional Communication Service, I have been privileged to be involved in and experience the positive impact that the Regional Communication Service has on services/local communities and their members that service individuals with complex communication needs.

Donna experienced a stroke 2 years ago which left her unable to speak. Since this event, she has been using her iPad, specifically the app Proloquo2Go, gestures, photos, and writing to communicate with her friends, family and members of the community.

The North West Regional Communication Service has recently partnered with the Royal Melbourne Hospital – Royal Park Campus to present training regarding communication access to new staff members. The aim was to equip new staff members with the skills and knowledge to communicate with individuals with complex communication needs. This could not have been done without the help and courage of a communication access consultant, Donna.

Stephanie and Donna

Donna played a major role in delivering the training. She began by sharing her personal experiences after her stroke: frustration and isolation when people could not communicate with her successfully and sadness when people treat her differently. She also shared her new expertise: the importance of having strategies and alternative communication methods to foster successful communication and interactions.

Staff marveled at Donna’s proficiency in using the Proloquo2go app and also discussed ways in which they could improve the current communication boards to better suit people who have communication disabilities or difficulties. 

Donna with the Royal Melbourne Hospital staff she mentors

Donna has a new-found confidence in sharing her story with a variety a people that interact with individuals who have complex communication needs. She continues to support these staff to enhance their skills in communicating with people who have communication difficulties.

Stephanie Popovich, North West Regional Communication Service

Communication Access at the City of Greater Bendigo

The City of Greater Bendigo Service Desks Communication Access Symbol assessment is probably happening right now! Good luck everybody!

The City of Greater Bendigo has a population of more than 110,000 people. A few years ago, it identified communication access as an important part of its Community Access and Inclusion Plan. It requested support from the Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service.

Initial planning and training took place with the Manager of Customer Support and some selected “champions” working on the City of Greater Bendigo Service Desks.

Other Managers were informed and consulted about City of Greater Bendigo’s actions to achieve communication access.

One of the CoGB Service Desk Communication Book produced in collaboration with Service Desk staff and clients by the Regional Communication Service

The Mayor and Councillors and the Disability Inclusion Reference Committee were informed and reviewed the communication aids. The website was reviewed and changed.

By the start of 2019 City of Greater Bendigo service desks in three locations felt nearly ready for assessment.

City of Greater Bendigo promoting its communication access initiatives

In the first half of the year, the Regional Communication Service and City of Greater Bendigo staff worked hard to realise their goal to be awarded the Communication Access Symbol at the three main Service hubs in Bendigo and Heathcote.

Early in the year the Regional Communication Service observed and reported to City of Greater Bendigo managers on communication accessibility at the Service Desks. This led to some meetings with managers, to review results and plan responses.

The Regional Communication Service worked closely with the Customers Support Manager to make sure commercial picture communication symbols were properly acknowledged, to create explanatory material for the public and staff, and to organise staff training, including pre training questionnaires and tasks, pre and post training evaluations, scenarios for inclusion in training, and payment for the co trainer, who was a Communication Access Assessor and an Augmentative and Alternative Communication user.

The Regional Communication Service planned the training with the Communication Access Assessor. Four two hour trainings were delivered so that all staff at Bendigo and Heathcote Service Desks could attend.

Evaluations indicated that the training was highly valued overall. Participating in scenarios and roles plays, learning to use communication aids, learning how to interact with people with communication disabilities, and being able to ask a person with communication disability questions were all repeatedly commended. Everyone reported that they would recommend the training to others. 

The Communication Access Symbol

After City of Greater Bendigo receives its award, the Regional Communication Service will continue to support the sustainability of communication access. For example:

  • There is an identified champion who will review important elements of communication access provided by the Regional Communication Service regularly.
  • Links to CAN videos have been provided to enable new staff to understand communication access and old staff to refresh their knowledge.
  • There will be further liaison with City of Greater Bendigo Education staff who attended the training to ensure continued staff support.
  • The Regional Communication Service is involving other local organisations who can help resource the City of Greater Bendigo in communication access.

We hope more City of Greater Bendigo services will be developing their communication access.

Now another local government area has approached the Regional Communication Service for communication support, after seeing what the City of Greater Bendigo has done.

Meg Irwin, Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service

Supporting communication in the South West: A two day Communication Expo

People living in regional areas often miss out on supports or services available in metropolitan cities. It’s no different for people living with a communication disability and those who support them. The South West Regional Communication Service partnered with the Warrnambool City & Moyne Shire Council Rural Access Officers to bring a Communication Access and AAC (Alternative and Augmentative Communication) Expo to the South West.

The Expo took place over two days in the lovely seaside town of Port Fairy. There were three separate sessions for different audiences: individuals with communication difficulties, their families and support workers; speech pathologists and other healthcare professionals; and staff from a number of South West Councils. Close to 60 people came along to the expo across the two days. A guest presenter, Alison Heppell, from Scope’s Non-Electronic Communication Aid Scheme (NECAS) and Kids Chat attended both days of the expo. Alison talked about the services provided by NECAS and Kids Chat for individuals with communication disabilities. She demonstrated a large number of non-electronic communication aids. After her presentations, everyone had the chance to try the aids out and ask Alison questions.

Exploring non electronic communication aids

Everyone was also able to learn about some of the electronic communication devices available to people with communication difficulties. Liberator (a company which makes communication devices) loaned us a number of devices for the expo. Everyone had fun trying out the different devices, programs and iPad apps, directly touching the buttons or screen) or by using alternative  access methods, such as switches and head pointing.

Staff from a number of local councils participated in communication access training to help them make their workplaces and offices more inclusive and welcoming for people with communication difficulties. They then took part in accessible information training and learnt how to produce documents and written information in a way which can be more easily understood by those who have difficulties reading.

Sonia speaking from experience

Speech pathologists, health care professionals and council staff also heard from a guest speaker with a disability, Sonia, about her experiences and the barriers to access she has encountered. Sonia, and her IT consultant, Justin, demonstrated a number of ways she maintains her independence at home and out in the community. She uses switches to control her iPad, lights, and electrical appliances in her house. Sonia showed everyone the computer program which enables her to type messages, surf the web and keep working as a tutor.

Feedback from the two days of the expo was extremely positive. Everyone said they learnt a lot of new information about communication difficulties, the different types of electronic and non-electronic communication aids and supports available to those with communication difficulties.

Charlotte – South West Regional Communication Service.

Working Together to Build Communication Access –          Our First Award!

The four young women taking action on communication access in Bendigo (see last month’s blog) have made their first award to a local small business for being so communication friendly.

They regularly visit the Terminus Milkbar in Golden Square. They have always felt respected and have been able to communicate successfully without speech.

The staff were delighted with the certificate. They put it up where everyone could see it.  

Presenting the certificate


Using the communication board to explain:  “You are welcoming, take time to communicate, talk directly to us, and listen really well.”High fives all round!Everyone is proud

Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service

Working together to Build Communication Access – an update

In July we wrote about the Communication Access Group in Bendigo.

In the first half of  2018, These four young women got ready to work for more communication access in their  town.

The group is supported by the Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service and Distinctive Options.

What’s happened?

The Regional Communication Service has continued to attend the group each month. The trained Communication Coordinator in Distinctive Options has continued with the group.

The group has steadily built skills. It is now easy for group members to identify items on picture  communication displays and use them to communicate their opinions and wishes.  (Through using the communication aids, some members of the group are saying some more  words and recognising more symbols and printed words.)

In August, the group contributed to a video. It showed people from all over Victoria using communication aids. The video was for Speech Pathology Week, which had the theme “Communication access is communication for all”. Group members showed community request cards and a communication board in the video.

Makng the video: Bendigo’s fountain and community request cards

In September, the group consulted on communication aids being developed by the local water authority. They were paid for this work by Coliban Water.

After reviewing the details, this group member was happy with the communication book

The Group also prepared to acknowledge good communication access at a local small business. They used a communication board to identify the good things the business does so that everyone can communicate.

A communication board to talk about communication access

The Group is now well on its way and contributing to communication access in Bendigo!

 

Personal Information Cards – For Emergencies and More

Gippsland Regional Communication Service and Wellington Shire Council have been working with local Emergency Relief Centres.

One of the things they did was develop a template and information so all members of the community could create a Personal information Card.

The card is wallet sized so a person can have it with them all the time.

On the front is the person’s name, date of birth, address, and two emergency contacts with phone numbers. On the back is the person’s communication/language, required supports and alerts.

The cards were developed for use in emergencies, particularly for people with disabilities. But the cards can be useful for everyone and at other times.

The template is on the BoardMaker program, which is used to produce visual communication aids.

 

Through previous partnerships with the Regional Communication Service, BoardMaker is available for public use at the Sale Library. An information sheet now sits with the Library’s BoardMaker discs: “How to make your own card”.

The Regional Communication Service also ran an information session for community members.

It was well attended. Everyone went home with their own personalised card.

 

The session was advertised on the local radio and in the newspaper Council notes. From the advertisements for the community session, there was further interest – this time from local police.

This simple idea may have a big future!

 

 

3 Days without speech for a Speech Pathologist

North West Regional Communication Services’s Steph Bryce decided to take a three day challenge of communicating without speech.

It was a way to raise awareness among her colleagues at IPC Health. It also gave her a chance to partially “walk in the shoes” of people with communication disabilities.

Steph reflected on some things she noticed…

It helped to have an introduction card.

It explained how she was communicating and why. It  provided the context for communication partners. Then they made more time to communicate.

It was natural to use many methods to communicate. 

Steph found that she  pointed to objects, typed out words, used facial expression and gesture –  often all in the same sentence!

At home, communication methods were different – and it was easier.

Steph used a ‘text to speech’ app on her iPad to type out messages. She found she used the iPad much less at home. There, she relied on gesture, facial expression and yes/no questions. It was quicker and required less effort.

There were a number of things to consider with communication technology.

Steph tried a few different text to speech apps and found apps with better predictive text easier to use.

She was speaking with an English accent (which did not suit her!) because the easiest app had no  alternative voice options.

She used an external speaker. The volume on the iPad was not sufficient for noisy environments or large groups.

She had to make sure that the iPad was charged at every opportunity. And she had to remember to take it everywhere.

Steph’s colleagues learnt a bit about communication and alternatives to speech. They are looking forward to working with the Regional Communication Service to improve communication access at IPC Health. 

Working Together to Build Communication Access – Southern Mallee Regional Communication Service

Everyone was ready around the table when Meg arrived just before 10.30. We waited for the others to leave and shut the door. We moved so we could see each other.
We talked about Communication.
We looked at a picture of two women talking – Communication is about understanding and getting your message across.
We talked about the different ways of communicating – We found 5 ways:
• Talking
• Signing (“Sign of the week” was “boat” so we used that.)
• Drawing
• Writing
• Choosing and pressing a button on the Tech Talk (a speech generating device)
We all had a go doing each one.

We know that not everyone speaks, but everyone communicates – and everyone has the right to communicate.
Meg left pictures and a folder for each of us. She left more information and the Tech Talker so Kharlie can practise with us until Meg comes again.

So ends a typical meeting of the Communication Access Group at Distinctive Options with the Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service.

What is the Communication Access Group?

The Communication Access Group is a group of four young women in Bendigo.
The group started meeting in January, 2018. They are supported by Kharlie, a Communication Coordinator, trained by the Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service [see the 21.6.18 blog]. Kharlie works at Community Connect, Distinctive Options. Meg is the Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service speech pathologist who comes to the group each month.

How did the Communication Access Group happen?

Last year Distinctive Options partnered with the Regional Communication Service to join the local Communication Coordinators Network.
A Distinctive Options disability support worker was trained by Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service to be a Communication Coordinator. Communication Coordinators have advanced communication support skills.
The partnership between the Regional Communication Service and Distinctive Options enabled more collaboration to start a communication access group.
The Regional Communication Service developed accessible consent forms for participants and parents to sign.

The manager at Bendigo Distinctive Options sent forms to 7 people and their families.
Four people agreed to participate. Two of them also consented to being photographed.
At the end of 2017, Distinctive Options asked the Regional Communication Service to train all staff. The training was in January. It focussed on effective communication support so everyone can participate.
Then the Communication Coordinator went on maternity leave! Luckily, there was time for a new Communication Coordinator to train. The Regional Communication Service held another Communication Coordinator course at the start of 2018.
Staff rosters at both the Regional Communication Service and Distinctive Options meant that meetings had to be monthly. (Fortnightly would have been better.) The Communication Coordinator is there every week. She supports the group to review everything when the Regional Communication Service does not come.

What has happened so far?

January: We all met each other. The Regional Communication Service speech pathologist saw how well some people watched and listened, that some could read words, that one could sign very well, that most could understand speech most of the time, that some already knew about their right to do what everyone else can do. Everyone was keen to interact. Speech was not everyone’s most effective way to communicate, but that did not stop everyone communicating!

February: We talked about communication. (The February meeting was described at the start.)

March: We tried AAC (Augmentative and Alternative Communication) – low and high tech. We looked at the wheelchair access symbol and found out what it meant.
Later, everyone looked out for the symbol.

April: We found out what “access” means and looked at the Communication Access symbol.

May: We found that the Communication Access symbol and the wheelchair access symbol look different and show different kinds of access.
We looked at personal communication cards

 

June – Something extra:

The Regional Communication Service speech pathologist saw the Group was ready to use a communication board so they could prepare to have impact in the community. She looked at the research and consulted other speech pathologists at the Communication and Inclusion Resource Centre and chose the best items for the board. She made the boards using the [email protected]+ on the iPad.

Everyone needed to learn how to use the communication board, through modelling and practice.

The communication access meetings continued. But more meetings started (at a different time) so everyone could to learn to use the board. This time, the Regional Communication Service allied health assistant will come. For the first meeting, the Regional Communication Service speech pathologist and another Distinctive Options disability support worker came as well.

Eventually the communication board will have 40 pictures. Everyone got their own copy with 8 pictures to start with. The Regional Communication Service also gave the two Distinctive Options workers other resources, including a chart of the Key Word Signs (for words that will be on the communication board) and a training package about how to model AAC.

 

 

What next?

Group members are learning about communication access and rights together. The  Communication Coordinator supports everyone to communicate in effective ways and in different places in the community. Everyone’s confidence and communication skills have grown. The group will work together for communication access in the community in the second half of 2018.