Tag Archives: southern loddon mallee regional communication service

Hospital Passports for people with disabilities

Hospitals are big and busy places. When people with specific needs or communication disabilities have to come to hospital, problems can arise. Research has repeatedly demonstrated poorer health outcomes for people with intellectual disabilities than for the general community.

Bendigo Health wanted to improve the way it provided services to this group and to others who faced barriers because of cognitive and/or communication barriers. The Victorian Department of Health and Human Services provided a grant to employ a project worker.

The Regional Communication Service was consulted as the project was getting off the ground. We provided information about the range of strategies and solutions in Augmentative and Alternative Communication, support, information access and way finding which have been used in other hospitals around the world.

The first and second pages of the Bendigo Health Hospital Passport

It was decided that the first strategy to try was the Hospital Communication Passport. This is a template developed in the UK for use in the Hospital setting. It provides information about how the person being admitted communicates, how to best support them, and who this person is as a person. It means that staff who read it, especially if they do so before the person arrives, can make the admission much more successful.

Over a couple of years the project worker (who was a speech pathologist) adapted the template for local use, spoke to many forums, formed partnerships, visited workplaces where people with disabilities were supported, spoke to people with disabilities, trained hospital staff, and did all the work that was needed to get the template to be used effectively.

The Regional Communication Service was involved along the way, in particular, with feedback from disability service staff and people with disabilities in the community about how the implementation of the Hospital Passport was going.

Last month, the project worker finished her work. Use of the Hospital Passport is now embedded in the Hospital’s procedures.

Read more about the Hospital Passport used by Bendigo Health at https://www.bendigohealth.org.au/disability_or_special_needs/

Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service

Communication Access at the City of Greater Bendigo

The City of Greater Bendigo Service Desks Communication Access Symbol assessment is probably happening right now! Good luck everybody!

The City of Greater Bendigo has a population of more than 110,000 people. A few years ago, it identified communication access as an important part of its Community Access and Inclusion Plan. It requested support from the Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service.

Initial planning and training took place with the Manager of Customer Support and some selected “champions” working on the City of Greater Bendigo Service Desks.

Other Managers were informed and consulted about City of Greater Bendigo’s actions to achieve communication access.

One of the CoGB Service Desk Communication Book produced in collaboration with Service Desk staff and clients by the Regional Communication Service

The Mayor and Councillors and the Disability Inclusion Reference Committee were informed and reviewed the communication aids. The website was reviewed and changed.

By the start of 2019 City of Greater Bendigo service desks in three locations felt nearly ready for assessment.

City of Greater Bendigo promoting its communication access initiatives

In the first half of the year, the Regional Communication Service and City of Greater Bendigo staff worked hard to realise their goal to be awarded the Communication Access Symbol at the three main Service hubs in Bendigo and Heathcote.

Early in the year the Regional Communication Service observed and reported to City of Greater Bendigo managers on communication accessibility at the Service Desks. This led to some meetings with managers, to review results and plan responses.

The Regional Communication Service worked closely with the Customers Support Manager to make sure commercial picture communication symbols were properly acknowledged, to create explanatory material for the public and staff, and to organise staff training, including pre training questionnaires and tasks, pre and post training evaluations, scenarios for inclusion in training, and payment for the co trainer, who was a Communication Access Assessor and an Augmentative and Alternative Communication user.

The Regional Communication Service planned the training with the Communication Access Assessor. Four two hour trainings were delivered so that all staff at Bendigo and Heathcote Service Desks could attend.

Evaluations indicated that the training was highly valued overall. Participating in scenarios and roles plays, learning to use communication aids, learning how to interact with people with communication disabilities, and being able to ask a person with communication disability questions were all repeatedly commended. Everyone reported that they would recommend the training to others. 

The Communication Access Symbol

After City of Greater Bendigo receives its award, the Regional Communication Service will continue to support the sustainability of communication access. For example:

  • There is an identified champion who will review important elements of communication access provided by the Regional Communication Service regularly.
  • Links to CAN videos have been provided to enable new staff to understand communication access and old staff to refresh their knowledge.
  • There will be further liaison with City of Greater Bendigo Education staff who attended the training to ensure continued staff support.
  • The Regional Communication Service is involving other local organisations who can help resource the City of Greater Bendigo in communication access.

We hope more City of Greater Bendigo services will be developing their communication access.

Now another local government area has approached the Regional Communication Service for communication support, after seeing what the City of Greater Bendigo has done.

Meg Irwin, Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service

A special recipe for Bourkie’s Bakery

The Woodend Communication Access Group has recognised Bourkie’s Bakery as a great place to be.

Bourkies Manager receiving the award from two of the Woodend Communication Access Group members

What was the recipe for this award to happen?

Ingredients:

The Group, comprising five people with communication disabilities living in Woodend.

The Woodend Communication Coordinator, who was trained and participates in the network supported by the Regional Communication Service.

The Regional Communication Service speech pathologist

The staff and management of Bourkies

Method:

Take the partnership between the Regional Communication Service and the Communication Coordinator. Mix with the Woodend Communication Access Group.

Add the Communication Access Network’s communication friendly certificate and the Regional Communication Services’s picture based communication board.

Leave to rise.

Take the risen mixture and bake… into a certificate that lists the great things Bourkies does

Serve:

VIsit Bourkies and present the certificate to the Manager and Staff with each Group member pointing out one reason for the award.

The icing on the cake

Next, the Communication Coordinator and the Communication Access Group will work with Bourkies to develop some picture based communication aids, so there can be even better communication.

Meg Irwin (Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service) with apologies for stretching a metaphor

Working together to Build Communication Access – There’s a communication aid for that!

The Communication Access Group in Bendigo was initiated by Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service (see our July, September & October blogs) in partnership with Distinctive Options, a day and lifestyle service. But the Group couldn’t have happened without Kharlie, Communication Coordinator and Disability Support Worker!

Kharlie worked closely with the young women in the Group, getting to know them well and supporting them to use communication aids and strategies and to learn about communication access in the community. Kharlie stayed in touch with the Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service and went to Communication Coordinator Network meetings. Distinctive Options provided time every fortnight for Kharlie to develop communication  aids and resources. The Communication Access Group, and others supported by Distinctive Options, got the benefits.

Here are just some of the things Kharlie developed:

  • Picture based (individual) choice boards
  • Picture and object based shopping lists
  • Picture based what to bring lists to prepare for outings
  • Picture based instructions such as safety in the kitchen
  • Picture based routines such as arrival or washing the dishes
  • Community request cards (shared and individual)
  • Who here photos of everyone (both participants and staff)
  • Picture based activity planner so everyone can plan the details of what will happen and have an accessible way to remember it
  • Picture based story guides for individuals such as a road safety book for one participant

And she’s inspired others:

Now staff include pictures in notices to go home. That means participants have more access to information that concerns them.

Now one member of the Communication Access Group gets resources organised to ensure that staff and participants keep developing more communication strategies.

Over the year, Kharlie’s understanding of communication strategies and contribution to communication access has grown. She will be able to support Distinctive Options to be an even more inclusive and innovative service for participants with little or no speech into the future.

Working Together to Build Communication Access –          Our First Award!

The four young women taking action on communication access in Bendigo (see last month’s blog) have made their first award to a local small business for being so communication friendly.

They regularly visit the Terminus Milkbar in Golden Square. They have always felt respected and have been able to communicate successfully without speech.

The staff were delighted with the certificate. They put it up where everyone could see it.  

Presenting the certificate


Using the communication board to explain:  “You are welcoming, take time to communicate, talk directly to us, and listen really well.”High fives all round!Everyone is proud

Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service