Tag Archives: training

Building for the Future – A local training organisation focuses on communication support skills in their Cert IV in Disability

In 2015 there were 4.3 million Australians living with disability, and over one-quarter (1.2 million people) had a communication disability.

The Certificate IV in Disability provides students with the skills and knowledge to work effectively with people with disabilities in a range of services. Students learn to develop and implement programs that empower people with disabilities to achieve greater independence and well being. Students later work in residential group homes, training resource centres, day respite centres, other community settings or people’s homes.

Many training organisations across Australia do not include optional communication units in their Cert IV Disability courses, but Federation University in Ballarat recognised that skills in communication are very important. They wanted their students to know more about communication and the different ways people can communicate.

This year, Grampians Regional Communication Service is working with Federation University for their Certificate IV in Disability, aiming to give students a more “hands on” experience of AAC devices and communication strategies.

The VET Teacher for Disability & Community Services and the Regional Communication Service speech pathologist are working together, focusing on developing student skills in identifying communication needs and implementing strategies to support communication needs.  Students will have an opportunity to try, experience and ask questions of a range of AAC devices, enabling future disability support workers to support others with their communication needs. Students will get to experience diverse AAC, such as Talking Mats, chat books, communication boards and books, community request cards and key word sign as well as speech generation devices. Assignments and lectures have been designed to have a more realistic feel and to focus on facilitating and supporting communication to increase independence and participation. Students are also informed of resources available such as allied health professionals, visual supports, Communication Access, Easy English and the National Relay Service. 

For more information on Federation University’s Certificate IV in Disability see: https://study.federation.edu.au/#/course/DLLA

By Georgie Turner, Grampians Regional Communication Service

Working together to Build Communication Access – There’s a communication aid for that!

The Communication Access Group in Bendigo was initiated by Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service (see our July, September & October blogs) in partnership with Distinctive Options, a day and lifestyle service. But the Group couldn’t have happened without Kharlie, Communication Coordinator and Disability Support Worker!

Kharlie worked closely with the young women in the Group, getting to know them well and supporting them to use communication aids and strategies and to learn about communication access in the community. Kharlie stayed in touch with the Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Communication Service and went to Communication Coordinator Network meetings. Distinctive Options provided time every fortnight for Kharlie to develop communication  aids and resources. The Communication Access Group, and others supported by Distinctive Options, got the benefits.

Here are just some of the things Kharlie developed:

  • Picture based (individual) choice boards
  • Picture and object based shopping lists
  • Picture based what to bring lists to prepare for outings
  • Picture based instructions such as safety in the kitchen
  • Picture based routines such as arrival or washing the dishes
  • Community request cards (shared and individual)
  • Who here photos of everyone (both participants and staff)
  • Picture based activity planner so everyone can plan the details of what will happen and have an accessible way to remember it
  • Picture based story guides for individuals such as a road safety book for one participant

And she’s inspired others:

Now staff include pictures in notices to go home. That means participants have more access to information that concerns them.

Now one member of the Communication Access Group gets resources organised to ensure that staff and participants keep developing more communication strategies.

Over the year, Kharlie’s understanding of communication strategies and contribution to communication access has grown. She will be able to support Distinctive Options to be an even more inclusive and innovative service for participants with little or no speech into the future.

Key Word Sign in Wangaratta

East Hume was treated to an outstanding basic Key Word Sign workshop at the Wangaratta Library in October. Marlene Eksteen, a qualified Key Word Sign Presenter, facilitated the workshop, and 16 people with a broad range of backgrounds, including support workers, day care teachers and parents, attended to further their knowledge of Key Word Sign.

The day incorporated lots of fun and practical activities where everyone was encouraged to practice and refine their signing skills!

‘Would you like a chocolate or a lolly?’ Participants received a yummy reward when they made their request with Key Word Sign!

During the morning we learnt about AAC (Alternative and Augmentative Communication) and its importance for people who have difficulty communicating. Participants were excited to learn how they could use Key Word Sign as a form of AAC.

We learnt about the different stages of communication and how Key Word Sign  can help at every level.

After lunch we attempted to bring on some Christmas cheer in October by learning how to sign ‘We Wish You A Merry Christmas’, which ended in lots of laughs!

We learnt how to finger spell the alphabet, and of course to introduce ourselves by spelling our names.

Participants were also given the opportunity to make their own scripts, which they could take home and practice with their loved ones/clients or other people they support. We also shared these with the group and learnt lots of new signs as we went.

Feedback from the day was resoundingly positive; with everyone saying that they loved the day and found it very relevant, practical and informative.

And we heard some comments that showed just how valuable Marlene’s session was:

“I feel much more confident to use Key Word Sign now – I always thought we could only use it with people who are deaf”

“I work in a disability home, and the staff who use Key Word Sign with the clients often seem to have a better rapport than staff who don’t”

We are looking forward to holding further Key Word Sign workshops in the East Hume region in the near future.

Kelsey and Meredith, East Hume Regional Communication Service

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communicating Choice in NDIS: Building NDIS Staff Skills – East Hume Regional Communication Service

East Hume Regional Communication Service facilitated a very successful Talking Mats training day in Wodonga this week.  Karyn Muscat from Zyteq presented to an enthusiastic fourteen participants from across the Wodonga and Wangaratta regions.

They included Local Area Coordinators, support coordinators from disability and mental health agencies, as well as speech pathologists and disability support workers.  A number of those attending also had family members with communication disabilities and were interested in gaining new skills to support their communication.

The session also provided networking opportunities. There were some very interesting conversations about the current disability services landscape.  The session also highlighted the role of the Regional Communication Service in advocating for people with communication disabilities and their support networks and the practical services we can provide.

Here’s some of the feedback on the day:

“I came to the training with a specific resident in mind, but I got so much more.  I can see this being beneficial for all of our guys”

“This will help me better support the vulnerable people who use our service with their decision making”

We were thrilled to be able to provide such a useful resource to a wide range of services and feel that it is a positive addition to the skills of disability services in our region.

 

Meredith and Kelsey

 

 

Communication Training for Local Area Coordinators – East Hume Regional Communication Service

Latrobe Community Health is working with local communities to ensure it is welcoming and inclusive for people with disabilities.

It partnered with the East Hume Regional Communication Service to improve its communication access.

Latrobe Community Health is the Region’s NDIS Local Area Coordinator organisation.

Local Area Coordinators are responsible for linking individuals to the National Disability Insurance Scheme and providing information and support in the community.

East Hume Regional Communication Service delivered training in two sessions at Wodonga and Wangaratta. Twenty seven Local Area Coordinators from across three sites (Benalla, Wangaratta and Wodonga) attended.Group of people attending onsite training

The training sessions increased awareness of the impact of a communication disability on an individual’s ability to be involved in decision making about their life, and how communication partners can provide meaningful support.

Wodonga team attending via video link up

Attendees participated enthusiastically in the communication training activities and enjoyed the sessions. Comments included:  “Extremely relevant to what we do.”; “Great information, engaging presentation.”; “I have done this type of training a number of times but never tire of the content and always learn something”; “Very positive and caring …presenter”

As a result of the success of this training, EHRCS has also been able to provide training for Murray Primary Health Network, and Partners in Recovery (who provide support for people with severe mental health issues).

East Hume Regional Communication Service is continuing to build the partnerships with providers of NDIS services in the North East region.

Bridging The Gap

“What to do after 3 days of communication coordination training”

We felt this was a question that most of us ask after attending any training session…… “Okay, I have learned some new information, but how do I put it into action?

With this in mind we planned a 4th day as a Resource Creation Day. The primary aim of the day was to provide an opportunity for Communication Coordinators to come together to create resources to support communication in their workplace.

The workshop format was informal and allowed everyone to raise an idea, brainstorm the concept using everyone’s knowledge and experience, and then to create it. The simple concept of creating resources seems to be a major barrier to communication coordinators fulfilling their role back in the workplace. Often they feel unsure about where to start or fearing that what they create will not work.

The ability to meet with others who have completed the training and identify that the feeling of potential failure is quite common, reassured most that ‘having a go’ was the essential first step. For some, the day provided an opportunity to discuss their ideas before taking the plunge to put it together for implementation.

Having staff on board and “on the same page”, was identified as one of the key indicators of whether communication strategies would be successful. It was also identified that this is difficult to attain at times. To attend a training session and then go back to the workplace with knowledge and a concept is very different to going back to the workplace with knowledge and a physical object/support. It is easier to have staff on the same page when they can see what the strategy is and implementation can begin immediately

The rural context means the tyranny of distance reduces the opportunities for staff from a variety of settings to come together and share their knowledge and experiences. This 4th day enabled networking across day services and accommodation services in the development of resources.

So what did we make?

  • Weekly timetables for whole of service
  • Individual visual schedules
  • Writing of a social story
  • Individual annual planner
  • Development of communication profiles
  • Developing scripts for client interactions
  • Activity choice board

 

 

 

 


Would we do it again?

Feedback from participants indicate that we have helped to bridge the gap between learning a new skill and implementing that skill. Of the 14 participants, all of them have requested another opportunity to come together and make re- sources with guidance and a collective brain. Comments included:

“Extremely useful, I went away achieving 3 plans for communication.” “Discussing and sharing ideas as a team and working together was the most useful.”

“I would like to see this happen every 3-6 months as it will open up new doors for better communication between staff and residents.”

So, yes, we will be offering this day again over the coming year as a strategy to support our Communication Coordinators in their day to day work.

By Emma Douglas & Sharon Champion

Value our volunteers: equipping them with the tools to engage people in local communities

As a student Speech Pathologist one of the many aspects of my placement with the eastern regional communication access network was to present at training workshops for community volunteers. The first training session was for community volunteers in the south-eastern region and the second training session was for community visitors who visit people with disabilities in residential housing and advocate for their needs if they can’t speak up for themselves.

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Key Word Sign training

The first training session involved volunteers from varying cultures and backgrounds. Some volunteers were working with people with disabilities on a regular basis and wanting to learn more strategies to improve effective communication. The others in the training worked with a range of people from those with mental health issues to people who were socially isolated. The content of the training included practical strategies for improved communication with people with communication difficulties, an explanation and discussion of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) and an introduction to the communication access symbol and what it represents.

Many people were also very interested in key word sign and what it is and learnt some helpful signs too! The volunteers were shown different AAC devices including low tech, paper based devices as well as some electronic AAC devices. There was a lot of interest surrounding the different devices and what were the possibilities with someone using these devices.

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Listening to Those Rarely Heard is a training package designed to guide supporters of people with severe to profound disability through the supported decision-making process.

The second training was for community advocates who were eager and enthusiastic to be given the training opportunity and therefore keen to learn new information. All of the advocates visit people with disabilities in their homes regularly. Many are individuals with severe intellectual disabilities where determining their preferences and concerns is very difficult. The presentation included an overview of communication, an introduction to supported decision making (Watson, 2013) and introduction to the concept of “Talking Mats” (Joan Murphy) as a potential tool for people who would benefit from structured conversation.

This group had indicated they would like to use a tool to gauge an individual’s situation and concerns so they could be better at advocating for the person. They were interested in how structured conversation may be a way of discussing meaningful topics that may require advocacy (e.g. living  arrangements, diet, activities).

These volunteers had an impressive understanding of how their client’s communicate and explained how they were able to differentiate between subtle differences in vocalisations, facial expressions or body language. The training was very well received and they were keen on doing further training particularly in applying Talking Mats to specific clients who may be able to use it and benefit from more detailed discussion around how they wanted their life to be.

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Talking Mats in action

All the volunteers responded with positive feedback and were very happy to have upskilled their abilities. It was very encouraging to know that there are very competent people willing to volunteer their time and who are eager and willing to be a part of change for individuals and their communities.

By Bethany Simons                               Supervised by Bron Jones
Student Speech Pathologist                Eastern Regional Communication Access Network

Watson, J. (2013). Listening to those rarely heard: Supported decision making in this brave new world of individualised services. Paper presented at the 11th Biennial AGOSCI conference, Sydney, Australia.

Supporting Horsham Rural City Council

In July 2016 Grampians Regional communication service was involved in a new initiative with Horsham Rural City Council. Horsham rural city council approached Grampians Regional Communication Service to be a part of their newly updated disability action plan. This action plan identified communication and disability awareness as an area for future training and support for the council. GRCS and Horsham Rural City Council combined forces to develop suitable training that was aimed at the following three key areas;

  1. Helping staff get a better understanding of the issues for people with disability
  2. Building staff confidence with communication when working with people with disability
  3. Providing staff with information in relation to creating a more inclusive environment for people with a disability.

horsham-city-councilThe communication and disability awareness training was run by Grampians Regional Communication Service over a series of workshops spread over two days. 150 participants attended the training with the content focused around building staff member’s confidence in communicating with people who have little or no speech. Staff members ranged from people working in customer service, management positions, information technology, engineering, home care as well as the local counsellors.

Overall the training was very successful leading to several other councils within the region expressing interest in training. Pleasingly there have also been several requests for further information in relation to communication access and in October it is anticipated Horsham Rural City Council will receive further training in relation to making their service more accessible to people with complex communication needs.

By Megan Nestor

Grampians Regional Communication Service